The Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (also known as the TKI) is designed to assess an individual’s behavior in conflict situations. Research has shown that there are five basic styles or modes for handling conflict. The Thomas Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument provides a profile of individuals and teams that indicates the repertoire of conflict-handling skills which you use in the kinds of conflict situations you face. Your profiles are compared to the scores of practicing managers in business and government organizations.

We use the TKI in a variety of different ways: stand-alone, as an assessment/diagnostic tool; integrated into a workshop on communication or conflict; or as a focused TKI workshop covering the principles and dimensions in depth.

The TKI Inventory assesses your behavior on five different dimensions:

  • Competing – the goal is to win
  • Avoiding – the goal is to delay
  • Compromising – the goal is to find a middle ground
  • Collaborating – the goal is to find a win-win situation
  • Accommodating – the goal is to yield

Here’s how the TKI Inventory can help you improve your working relationships:

  • By explaining the 5 conflict-handling styles and explaining how your answers compare to other managers who have taken this assessment.  Depending on your results, the TKI provides suggestions on how your styles may be affecting your current working relationships.
  • The instrument provides individuals and teams with the following benefits:
  • Increase one’s effectiveness in conflict management
  • Increase one’s perspective as to the various sources of conflict and it’s impact on organizations
  • Understand the five basic styles of managing conflict, and your own predominant style
  • Develop skills in collaborative conflict management
  • Develop awareness of your predominate personality style based upon Relationship Awareness Theory
  • Develop awareness of flexing your style to increase your effectiveness with people who have style different than your own

Thomas-Kilman Conflict Mode Instrument The Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (also known as the TKI) is designed to assess an individual’s behavior in conflict situations. Research has shown that there are five basic styles or modes for handling conflict. The Thomas Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument provides a profile of individuals and teams that indicates the repertoire of conflict-handling skills which you use in the kinds of conflict situations you face. Your profiles are compared to the scores of practicing managers in business and government organizations.

We use the TKI in a variety of different ways: stand-alone, as an assessment/diagnostic tool; integrated into a workshop on communication or conflict; or as a focused TKI workshop covering the principles and dimensions in depth.

The TKI Inventory assesses your behavior on five different dimensions: Competing – the goal is to win Avoiding – the goal is to delay Compromising – the goal is to find a middle ground Collaborating – the goal is to find a win-win situation Accommodating – the goal is to yield.

Here’s how the TKI Inventory can help you improve your working relationships: By explaining the 5 conflict-handling styles and explaining how your answers compare to other managers who have taken this assessment.  Depending on your results, the TKI provides suggestions on how your styles may be affecting your current working relationships.

The instrument provides individuals and teams with the following benefits:Increase one’s effectiveness in conflict management Increase one’s perspective as to the various sources of conflict and it’s impact on organizations Understand the five basic styles of managing conflict, and your own predominant style Develop skills in collaborative conflict management Develop awareness of your predominate personality style based upon Relationship Awareness Theory Develop awareness of flexing your style to increase your effectiveness with people who have style different than your own.

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